They don't want to bite the hands that feed them, especially after the pandemic has hampered so many people's financial situations, but it does make it kind of hard after Goodwill has recently publicly asked folks to stop donating "garbage."

What do they mean by "garbage"?

Notwithstanding the people who actually donate literal "garbage", Goodwill stores have asked people to stop donating things like non-working electronics or damaged furniture. They themselves don't have the resources to refurbish things that could best be donated to the curb on your local community's trash amnesty day. It goes without saying that things like flashlights with leaking batteries are not welcome at Goodwill. The Associated Press states that in Wisconsin and Illinois, Goodwill stores are seeing a rash of donations of flammable and hazardous materials, which has prompted their call to the public to make sure you're only donating safe and usable goods as you work on your spring cleaning.

The influx of these items also costs Goodwill because they have to dispose of the unusable junk you've "donated" to them. They are simply a nonprofit organization trying to help the community, not a landfill.

Get our free mobile app

So what CAN I donate?

Don't be deterred from giving to Goodwill or similar organizations. They still appreciate and welcome the usual "gently used" clothing, home goods and other items that are in safe, working condition that you just no longer want to keep around. Goodwill officials say it's best to check their website for your local area's needs.

 

READ MORE: See 50 remote jobs that can pay well