In Shullsburg, Wisconsin you will come across the letters "GH" on County Road U. That means you've found the famous Gravity Hill. Until I stumbled upon this I would have not been able to guess what the letters stood for. But, yes, the 'GH' Aside from letters sprayed painted on the ground there isn't much else to do in Shullsburg (except for these things) but, as I said, when you reach Gravity Hill you will be scratching your head if you stop reading now.

Travel Wisconson explains what to expect in a simplified way,

If you park your car on the road (being careful of traffic), put the car in neutral, and take your foot off the accelerator and brake, your car will appear to back up, uphill, for half a mile.

What they're saying is you put your vehicle in neutral while on this seemingly flat road and it will roll back ("uphill") for a half-mile at 20 miles per hour but how? Spoiler alert: it's all an illusion, according to Atlas Obscura.

Although the road at Gravity Hill is actually slanted downwards, visual cues in the surrounding region make it appear to be an incline.

A sign posted near "GH" reads, "Gravity Hill Instructions, put your car in neutral and enjoy rolling uphill and defying the laws of gravity!" There's a reminder that you are on a public road and watch for oncoming traffic and "enjoy at your own risk."

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Gravity Hill Videos

Plenty of folks have ventured to the Gravity Hill. Take a look at some of their videos:

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