Several days ago I stood out on my front porch and just stood and enjoyed the temperatures that were in the mid-'40s. Not bad for a day in early February. Days like that get you thinking about Spring. And while we're all looking forward to warmer days, green grass, and blooming trees, Spring also brings the risk of flooding to Eastern Iowa.

The National Weather Service Thursday released their first outlook for possible Spring flooding in 2022, according to KWWL. The news early this year is good. As of right now, the Spring flood outlook is near to below normal for much of Eastern Iowa. Any Spring flooding that happens is because of the precipitation that fell during the fall and winter. The NWS reports that precipitation last fall was near to slightly below normal for most of Eastern Iowa. Our winter precipitation levels are also slightly below normal.

Another key factor to look at is the snow depth. KWWL reports that snow depths of less than 6 inches are being reported across Eastern Iowa and Southern Minnesota.

via NOAA
via NOAA
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Those snow depth numbers are also near or below average for Eastern Iowa for this time of year. KWWL also reports that frost and ground moisture levels are also low, meaning that the ground is able to absorb more water when it melts or falls as rain. The NWS also reports that rivers in Iowa currently have plenty of room for snowmelt and precipitation.

The bottom line is that when you consider all the factors, there is less than a 50% chance of flooding in Eastern Iowa for the months of February, March, and April.

via NOAA
via NOAA
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This is certainly good news for farmers and everyone living in Eastern Iowa as we head towards Spring. But what is the old saying about the weather in Iowa? Wait five minutes...

 

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