Sixteen-and-a-half million people have filed for unemployment in the last three weeks, according to Forbes. Every day brings more urgency to the need for the government's stimulus checks for millions of Americans. It also provides more opportunities for scammers. Here are five scams the FBI and attorney generals from a number of states are saying to watch out for, according to KMPH:

  1. Scammers are sending out fake checks. They may say a small fee needs to be paid before you can cash the check. In some instances, your bank information is requested. You don't need to do either when you receive the real check from the government.
  2. Someone who claims that if you pay a fee for check processing, you'll receive yours quicker.
  3. Anything that you receive that says it's from the Treasury Department.
  4. Watch out for scammers contacting you on social media, asking for your personal information.
  5. Non-existent agencies that want access to your social security number.

When can you expect to see the stimulus money? Some Americans should see it arrive in their bank accounts next week. Lisa Greene-Lewis, a CPA (certified public accountant) at TurboTax, told USA Today those on Social Security and with low incomes are being prioritized by the government to receive the money first. Once direct deposits are complete, paper checks will be sent by the Internal Revenue Service.

Finally, one other scam to watch out for. People claiming to have a COVID-19 vaccine to sell you. There is still no vaccine for the virus. MarketWatch reported earlier today 21 different companies are working on vaccines or treatments for the virus. Any vaccine is still months away, at best, but the fact that so many companies are working on them is definitely good news.