Charlotte Boyer is only 17 and has already had the thrill of a lifetime. An all-expense-paid trip to Los Angeles so she could audition for the popular television show, 'The Voice.' Soon, America will get the chance to see her.

Boyer is a junior at Rock Island High School in Rock Island, Illinois, according to WVIK. Our Quad Cities says she's been writing songs and playing the guitar since she was only 10. Two years ago, she was part of "Amplify Quad Cities: The Soundtrack," in support of the United Way. She was the youngest songwriter included.

Charlotte told Our Quad Cities how her appearance on 'The Voice' came about:

My mom submitted a video of me to the website and I guess someone found it, and I was invited to audition.

WVIK reports that the trip Charlotte and her dad took to California was for the entire month of October. After arriving, they quarantined for two weeks, before Charlotte visited the NBC studios for what the show calls "the blind auditions."

Charlotte says the audition was,

a very long process and I was lucky to even be a part of it all. I’m not sure what the number was, but there were a lot of auditions, a lot of people that did try out. I was one of the few that got lucky.

Charlotte will be appearing on the show on one of the four remaining dates listed below. She doesn't know if it will be March 8, 9, 15, or 22. We'll just have to tune in to NBC on those nights to find out.

When she performed on PBS in the summer of 2019, Charlotte's talents were obvious. You can watch that below. If you'd like to watch a 30+ minute performance from last month, click HERE.

What song did Charlotte sing on the blind auditions on 'The Voice?' She can't say. She also can't divulge if any of the judges turned around. If none of them did, they clearly missed what I see. This is a very talented young woman.

LOOK: Milestones in women's history from the year you were born

Women have left marks on everything from entertainment and music to space exploration, athletics, and technology. Each passing year and new milestone makes it clear both how recent this history-making is in relation to the rest of the country, as well as how far we still need to go. The resulting timeline shows that women are constantly making history worthy of best-selling biographies and classroom textbooks; someone just needs to write about them.

Scroll through to find out when women in the U.S. and around the world won rights, the names of women who shattered the glass ceiling, and which country's women banded together to end a civil war.