Well, not really, but we're switching our clocks back this weekend.

Forgive the punny pictures and title.

It's your favorite time of the year. The end of daylight saving (without an s) time.

Yes, we "fall back" one hour and set our clocks back Saturday night, or by 2 a.m. Sunday, if you're still up. Your microwave and stove might be the only two clocks left in your house that still require you to do it manually (unless you're an old fogey like me).

If you wonder why we still do this, so do a lot of people. It was reportedly implemented as a way to save energy and fuel, as well as what some debunk as a myth: to give farmers (and those of us in general who like to see the sun) more of it to do their work (or play) in nicer weather, when we turn the clocks ahead in the spring.

So, it begs the question, why can't we just keep it that way year-round? Eliminating Daylight Saving Time has been talked about for years, yet most states still do it. Arizona and Hawaii, as well as Puerto Rico, Guam and the Virgin Islands don't. No wonder people flock there. Then there's the seasonal affective disorder thing that some people have when the time change happens. Unfortunately for some, that's not just a time-change thing.

It's debatable, but I know I prefer longer daylight hours. Basically, unless you work ungodly hours anyway (shoutout to my morning show friends and all you third-shifters), you'll be going to work with the sun out Monday but coming home in the dark.

President Lyndon Johnson is responsible for this whole thing. He signed it into law in 1966.

So if you ever wished you could turn back time, this is the weekend to do it.

 

[Via History Channel, USA Today, Mayo Clinic]