Iron Maiden launched their own version of the Beat the Intro app just ahead of their new European tour.

The app comes with a starter pack of introductions to songs from their catalog, which fans are challenged to identify as quickly as possible. The rewards allow players to increase their rankings and gain access to more challenges.

“A while back the guys from Beat the Intro came to see us about putting some Iron Maiden tracks in their game,” the band posted on its Facebook page. “We were like 'ok, but it's got to be hard, Maiden fans don't mess about.' That idea mutated into a standalone app - Iron Maiden's Bea(s)t The Intro - available now for free in Google, Apple and Amazon app stores. Just search Iron Maiden and you'll find it. Pack one is but a gentle introduction. Your long-suffering and perennially tetchy webmaster has personally curated the contents of each pack, making them harder and harder. If pack four doesn't leave some of you sat in a corner sobbing, I haven't done my job.”

“The faster you can identify the tracks correctly, the more points you can win to help move you up the charts," the game explains. "The coins you earn or buy can be used to unlock new packs of music! You get a Starter Pack of hits and enough coins to unlock another pack of your choice for free. You can also earn coins by watching videos, sharing your scores on Facebook, challenging your friends ... and much more. Each pack has three levels … earn enough points to be a Three-Star Player on Level 1 and you can jump to Level 2. Earn another 3 Stars and you can jump up to the next Level … 9 Stars on Level 3 and can you top the chart?”

Maiden’s Legacy of the Beast tour starts in Talinn, Estonia, tomorrow. Singer Bruce Dickinson recently said he wouldn’t be talking to fans during the shows as much as he used to. “I’m not planning that on this tour because we’ve got so much to do and there’s so much going on," he explained. "The show and the music is gonna carry the whole bloody thing. I’m pretty intimately involved in the show. There’ll be a couple of moments of chat with the audience, but it should be completely self-explanatory what’s going on – the drama should be in the transitions of the stage and the music.”