[UPDATE 10/10 10 a.m.] The forecast crest of the Cedar River at Cedar Rapids has been lowered again, now to moderate flood stage. The river is expected to crest at 15.8 feet Saturday, October 13.

NOAA

[UPDATE 10/10 6 a.m.] The forecast crest of the Cedar River in Cedar Rapids has been lowered to 16.9 feet. The river is expected to hit that level Saturday (10/13) evening, before beginning to recede.

NOAA

[UPDATE 10/8 9 p.m.] The forecast crest for the Cedar River at Cedar Rapids has been lowered more than a foot, to 18.5 feet Sunday, October 14.

NOAA

[ORIGINAL STORY] Here we go again. The Cedar River in Cedar Rapids is within its banks at this hour, but that is going to be changing drastically over the next few days.

As of 11:00  this morning, the Cedar was just over 11 feet in Cedar Rapids. It's expected to climb above the 12-foot flood stage early Tuesday (10/9) afternoon and the current forecast crest is 19.7 feet early Sunday (10/14) afternoon. If the river reaches that level, it would be the 5th-highest crest in Cedar Rapids history. It would be very close to the top three.

The five highest recorded levels on the Cedar River in Cedar Rapids are:

  1. June 13, 2008: 31.12'
  2. September 27, 2016: 21.97'
  3. June 1, 1851: 20'
  4. March 18, 1929: 20'
  5. Crest forecast for October 14, 2018: 19.7'
  6. March 31, 1961: 19.66'

Something for all of us to remember with these crest forecasts: According to NOAA, they

... take into account past precipitation and the precipitation amounts expected approximately 48 hours into the future from the forecast issuance.

Please don't consider that a reason to relax on this situation, especially with the possibility of heavy rain through early Tuesday afternoon. The Flash Flood Watch from the National Weather Service encompasses the entire Cedar River basin and continues through 1 p.m. Tuesday, October 9. Localized rainfall amounts of one to three inches are possible.

We'll keep you up-to-date with the very latest on this situation and let's all beg Mother Nature for some dry weather.

NOAA